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Corella parallelogramma

(Müller, 1776)


Tine Kinn Kvamme Gas Mantle Ascidian - Corella parallelogramma Drøbak, Norway Canon G12, Canon housing, ISO 200 internal flash + torch.

Message posted on UWphotographers on 31 Jul 2013
Paula Lightfoot Is this Corella parallelogramma? It was about 2cm tall, found under a boulder in the intertidal.

Wilfried Bay-Nouailhat I'd rather say Ciona intestinalis

Penny Martin I thought the mesh like structure inside was characteristic of Corella parallelogramma ?? the "Gas mantle"

Paula Lightfoot Thank you! That was my first thought because of the yellow pigment, but I got confused - I've never seen such a small one before!

Becky Hitchin I'd say Ciona too, a baby one

David Kipling A constipated Ciona. Babies are a bit more transparent and you can see the branchial sac. Key ID feature is the yellow round the siphons. It's a bit contracted up but would look more Ciona-like if you put it underwater ... it's a very contractile species (another ID feature).

Message posted on NE Atlantic Tunicata on 20 May 2012
David Kipling Ciona intestinalis in a dish, showing prominent branchial sac in juveniles (they're thinner and more transparent so you can see it easier than in adults). And the yellow siphon tips. For Paula Lightfoot and Penny Martin. Rumours that I keep these as pets are over-stated ...

Penny Martin thanks ... I will now go back and review photos of ones that I thought were corella parallelogramma ... I bet some are ciona .... I have so much to learn ... thank you for sharing !!

Becky Hitchin what do Cor. p. look like as juveniles? Is the gas mantle net still very visible?

David Kipling Dunno - never been anywhere with loads of Cor. p. There seem to be loads in Orkney though, so we'll have to ask Penny to have a look out and let us know...

Becky Hitchin Nor me. Penny, there's a quest for you!

David Kipling She could also do IVF and let some babies settle onto plates, and then release them into the wild and monitor them. Easy to do with tools available at your local IKEA ...

Becky Hitchin Orkney has a local IKEA? :P

David Kipling OK, Spar shop ...

Penny Martin Co-op or Tescos ?? tell me how ... sounds like fun .... and there are hundreds in the bay in front of my house !!

David Kipling I'll sort you out a recipe and some kit ;)

Penny Martin :-) Thanks ...... I need some pets !!

Liz Morris you geeks are brilliant! David, are you having problems blurring reality with rumours? I bet your pet Cionas even have names!!??

David Kipling Now that would be silly Liz ;) Mind you, the baby Corella p's I made on an IoS trip with Angela and others a few years back was called "junior", with drawings of its development from sperm to mini embryos put on the blackboard each day. Think of me as Sheldon Cooper in scuba gear ...

David Kipling Oh, and for the record Ciona doesn't normally have bright green poo (like this specimen). I've been feeding it spirulina.

Liz Morris Sounds like a fun trip. I need to get out of North Wales (just for trips!). Ha ha... I've never heard of this programme but I shall endeavour to find it and view it. I'm sure that you're not like Sheldon Cooper,wikipedia states he "exhibits a strict adherence to routine, a total lack of social skills, a tenuous understanding of irony, sarcasm, and humor, and a general lack of humility or empathy". I think you understanding of irony and humor is wonderful, and your social skills aren't bad either ;P

Liz Morris or watch the programme... that might be tonight's 'job'!

Message posted on NE Atlantic Tunicata on 20 May 2012
Paula Lightfoot Is this Corella parallelogramma? It was about 2cm tall, found under a boulder in the intertidal.

Wilfried Bay-Nouailhat I'd rather say Ciona intestinalis

Penny Martin I thought the mesh like structure inside was characteristic of Corella parallelogramma ?? the "Gas mantle"

Paula Lightfoot Thank you! That was my first thought because of the yellow pigment, but I got confused - I've never seen such a small one before!

Becky Hitchin I'd say Ciona too, a baby one

David Kipling A constipated Ciona. Babies are a bit more transparent and you can see the branchial sac. Key ID feature is the yellow round the siphons. It's a bit contracted up but would look more Ciona-like if you put it underwater ... it's a very contractile species (another ID feature).

Message posted on NE Atlantic Tunicata on 20 May 2012
James Lynott Lots of squirts to be found in Loch Long last night. This photo was taken at about 20m and contains a number of different species. I hope I am right with the IDs of Ascidia virginea, Ascidia mentula, Corella parallelogramma, Ciona intestinalis, Polycarpa pomaria, and possibly Ascidiella scabra? I'm not sure of the cream coloured one to the right of the A. mentula either.

David Kipling Gosh, what a mix! I'd agree with you as far as I can see. The aspersa//scabra distinction is still one that's difficult for me (although I gather this has been a discussion for decades!) and there may actually be something of a species complex here if you talk to Bernard. Apparently there's a big difference in the number of guard hairs (so start looking down siphons if you can do that without them closing!) and also the eggs of one but not the other species float (yeah, right ...).

Message posted on NE Atlantic Tunicata on 28 Sep 2013
Becky Hitchin A nice rockpool scene from Elmer Rock Islands. Wondering if the anemone is Sagartia elegans

Andy Horton Probably Actinothoe sphyrodeta

Becky Hitchin d'you know, that's what I meant to say. doh. But odd to see intertidally?

David Kipling What are the squirts becky?

Becky Hitchin They're Corella. Not sure whether eumyota or parallelogramma, can't remember offhand what parallelogramma looks like!

Andy Horton I occasionally see this sea anemone between the tides. Less than one a year on the Sussex coast.

Becky Hitchin We had 2 today :)

Claire Goodwin Hi Becky. Corella parallelogramma usually has a more translucent test. C. eumyota is an invasive species but common in several places - do you get it in your area? It does look the right colour (but hard to give definitive ID from this angle).

David Kipling If they look like Werther's Originals then they eumyota :)

David Kipling Although we could be techie and look at gut loop positions, but it is Sunday evening ...

Becky Hitchin The gut loop certainly very eumyota-ish. As did the colour. I'm just not that familiar with parallelogramma - we get eumyota only. I'm not entirely sure about Sussex, Claire Goodwin, but we've started to get them on the shore in a few places around Kent (and in marinas over the previous year) so it wouldn't surprise me to see them in Sussex too.

David Kipling I think a couple of reasons they're not C. parallelogramma (thinking of Penny's pics). First is the gut loop. C. parallelogramma has a very L-shaped gut, in fact the whole thing is quite square in shape, as opposed to the more rounded look of these. Second is that parallelogramma fix on by the bottom, not the side surface like these. So I'd say def not parallelogramma, but could live with eumyota (having only seen them once on a pontoon in Plymouth).

Becky Hitchin I'd be surprised if they weren't eumyota, I was mainly just wafting parallelogramma about as I don't know them. eumyota has a very J shaped loop, very corrugated in appearance

Becky Hitchin My main real sort of reservation is that the siphons here are much more orangey in colour over a bigger area than our Kent ones

Taxonomy
Animalia (Kingdom)
  Chordata (Phylum)
    Tunicata (Subphylum)
      Ascidiacea (Class)
        Phlebobranchia (Order)
          Corellidae (Family)
            Corella (Genus)
              Corella parallelogramma (Species)
Associated Species