Purple Octopus - using citizen science to discover marine interactions
This is the entity page showing aggregated messages and images for the named entity.


Anthopleura thallia

(Gosse, 1854)


Erling Svensen As they grow shallow, very exposed on pure rock it is not easy to get a picture from the side that shows the column. Here is the best I have.

Meg Daly This does not look like Anthopleura from the side. I see no acrorhagi (which would be between the tentacles) and the column looks pretty smooth (no attached debris).

Meg Daly This is why I like my anemones dead!

Bernard Picton I think I see acontia beneath the skin too.

Erling Svensen Cruel you Meg. I need to get some in alcohol and formalin for you ;-). I have bought formalin - so next time the weather is nice.,........

Andy Horton You don't want them dead. But alive in an aquarium. Do the acrorhagi show in Anthopleura thallia ?

Bernard Picton Meg and I have a paper in press on Anthopleura thallia. We came across a recent paper: den Hartog & Ates. Actiniaria from Ria de Arosa. Zool. Med. Leiden 85 (2011) which says "Wood (2005: 73, as Anthopleura thallia) published a picture of S. ornata taken in the Outer Hebrides." We found a substantial population of Anthopleura thallia in Co. Donegal, Ireland and I got some good photographs showing the acrorhagi. http://www.habitas.org.uk/marinelife/photo.asp?item=nkn_9008

Message posted on NE Atlantic Cnidaria on 14 Mar 2012
Chris Wood Images of Anemones and Corals We are revising the Seasearch Guide to Anemones and Corals of Britain and Ireland with a view to publishing a second editiion this spring. If anybody has good images they would like us to have a look at please send them to chris@seasearch.org.uk Pictures need to be in situ, and taken in Britain and Ireland. We are interested particularly in images showing behaviour, predation, reproductive activity and those of the following less common species (no jewel anemones please!) Sarcodictyon roseum/catenatum Epizoanthus incrustans (sand/gravel habitat) Stomphia coccinea Anthopleura thallia (rock pools/SW) Aiptaisiogeton pellucidus (tiny, shallow, SW) Haliplanella lineata (harbours, rock pools) Anemonactis mazeli (deep water) Hacampoides elongatus/abyssorum Cataphellia brodricii Caryophyllia inornata Sphenotrochus andrewianus Hoplangia durotrix There is a free copy of the guide for anybody whose pictures we use of course.

Wendy Northway I'll go through my hubby's photos to see if he has anything of interest Chris.

Darryl Mayer I have some of Stomphia coccinea, Mycale lingua (L Sunart, 40m), Imperial Anemone (various colours). Kirsty Jeffery has Dead Men's Fingers "birthing", I've let them know about your call.

Tony Gilbert Chris, have emailed a selection including Sarcodictyon and Epizoanthus.

Message posted on Seasearch Identifications on 05 Jan 2013
Erling Svensen I have tried for long time to give this species a name. Could it be a Norwegian form of Anthopleura thallia, Phellia gausapata or Cataphellia brodicii? It lives very, very exposed from 2-3 meters only down to 10 meters. The diameter is only aprox. 1 cm.

Chris Wood Erling Svensen can you check the column and see if it has stripes, sticky warts, non sticky warts etc? Phellia has sticky warts so would have little pieces of gravel etc stuck to it. Both Cataphellia and Anthopleura thallia are supposed to be southerly species so would be unlikely in Norway. Anthopleura is usually in rock pools partly covered in gravel/sand. I am not sure about Cataphellia I don't think I have ever seen it.

Erling Svensen Thanks Chris. I would do so.

Brendan Oonk I have asked Ron Ates (author of "Anemones of Dutch coast" about this pic. This is ( a translated abstact of) his answer: This is not an easy identification. I am confinced that it is a Sagartia-species. The patern in the oral disc is not typical for S. elegans. That would mean it is most likely S. troglodytes. If you check the acontia, these should be twice as thick in S. elegans than in S. troglodytes.

Erling Svensen Thanks. The acontia are quite thin in this species, so probably you are right.

Message posted on NE Atlantic Cnidaria on 17 Jun 2013
Marco Faasse Anthopleura thallia or Aulactinia verrucosa? : http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=240423339331863&set=a.240422209331976.60050.112028422171356&type=3&theater

Marco Faasse Other photo: http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=240423742665156&set=a.240422209331976.60050.112028422171356&type=3&theater

Marco Faasse I was considering to go there because I was convinced this was Anthopleura thallia, which I would like to see. Now I have serious doubts. I'll go up north and search for Bolocera and Gonactinia instead.

Bernard Picton I think these are Aulactinia verrucosa (previously known as Bunodactis verrucosa). http://www.habitas.org.uk/marinelife/photo.asp?item=aulver

Andy Horton I would go for Bunodactis verrucosa. That's because although I knew the new name I am still stuck with the old one.

Message posted on NE Atlantic Cnidaria on 14 Mar 2012
Erling Svensen One more from the dive today. Very, very exposed (first dive exposed for more than 4 months) on a rock-wall, only the North Sea between me and UK. There were many, many tine anemones from 3 meter to 5 meters deep. Only 1 cm across. I have a feeling that this is Anthopleura thallia. Agree?

Meg Daly I can't see the acrorhagi or column in this view. The oral disc pattern and tentacles are very "Anthopleura-y" to me, though.

Marco Faasse The black an white B-shaped marks near the base of the tentacles are typical of Sagartia troglodytes. The habitat is not typical for this soft substrate species though. That being said, this species does occur on rock in somewhat exposed areas in some numbers, but does not grow as large as usual there.

Bernard Picton I think this is what I'm calling Sagartia ornata. I saw them at Egersund in just a few metres when I visited you Erling.

Erling Svensen Well, I can not agree in this one, Bernard. This one growd only in the most exposed places, shallow, and It do not looks like the one I call S. ornata. I will find some more pictures....

Marco Faasse I have never been able to find S. ornata sublittorally, except in brackish water. It's a viviparous species, it's not a rare event to see them produce young, but I've never seen this in Sagartias with the B-marks.

Marco Faasse After looking at some of my photos I must correct my statement about the absence of B-marks in S. ornata. So it seems not impossible to me that this is S. ornata in spite of the habitat being unusual for this species as well.

Message posted on NE Atlantic Cnidaria on 14 Mar 2012
Chris Wood Images of Anemones and Corals We are revising the Seasearch Guide to Anemones and Corals of Britain and Ireland with a view to publishing a second editiion this spring. If anybody has good images they would like us to have a look at please send them to chris@seasearch.org.uk Pictures need to be in situ, and taken in Britain and Ireland. We are interested particularly in images showing behaviour, predation, reproductive activity and those of the following less common species (no jewel anemones please!) Sarcodictyon roseum/catenatum Epizoanthus incrustans (sand/gravel habitat) Stomphia coccinea Anthopleura thallia (rock pools/SW) Aiptaisiogeton pellucidus (tiny, shallow, SW) Haliplanella lineata (harbours, rock pools) Anemonactis mazeli (deep water) Hacampoides elongatus/abyssorum Cataphellia brodricii Caryophyllia inornata Sphenotrochus andrewianus Hoplangia durotrix There is a free copy of the guide for anybody whose pictures we use of course.

Andy Horton http://www.glaucus.org.uk/S-troglo2.htm

Nathan Jones Has this been completed now or are you still receiving pics?

Chris Wood Yes Nathan. The re-write is almost done but not gone to publishers yet so still time for new pictures, especially if they are of the rarer ones.

Message posted on Seasearch on 05 Jan 2013
Erling Svensen I have tried for long time to give this species a name. Could it be a Norwegian form of Anthopleura thallia, Phellia gausapata or Cataphellia brodicii? It lives very, very exposed from 2-3 meters only down to 10 meters. The diameter is only aprox. 1 cm.

Chris Wood Erling Svensen can you check the column and see if it has stripes, sticky warts, non sticky warts etc? Phellia has sticky warts so would have little pieces of gravel etc stuck to it. Both Cataphellia and Anthopleura thallia are supposed to be southerly species so would be unlikely in Norway. Anthopleura is usually in rock pools partly covered in gravel/sand. I am not sure about Cataphellia I don't think I have ever seen it.

Erling Svensen Thanks Chris. I would do so.

Brendan Oonk I have asked Ron Ates (author of "Anemones of Dutch coast" about this pic. This is ( a translated abstact of) his answer: This is not an easy identification. I am confinced that it is a Sagartia-species. The patern in the oral disc is not typical for S. elegans. That would mean it is most likely S. troglodytes. If you check the acontia, these should be twice as thick in S. elegans than in S. troglodytes.

Erling Svensen Thanks. The acontia are quite thin in this species, so probably you are right.

Message posted on NE Atlantic Cnidaria on 17 Jun 2013
Marco Faasse Anthopleura thallia or Aulactinia verrucosa? : http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=240423339331863&set=a.240422209331976.60050.112028422171356&type=3&theater

Marco Faasse Other photo: http://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=240423742665156&set=a.240422209331976.60050.112028422171356&type=3&theater

Marco Faasse I was considering to go there because I was convinced this was Anthopleura thallia, which I would like to see. Now I have serious doubts. I'll go up north and search for Bolocera and Gonactinia instead.

Bernard Picton I think these are Aulactinia verrucosa (previously known as Bunodactis verrucosa). http://www.habitas.org.uk/marinelife/photo.asp?item=aulver

Andy Horton I would go for Bunodactis verrucosa. That's because although I knew the new name I am still stuck with the old one.

Message posted on NE Atlantic Cnidaria on 14 Mar 2012
Andy Horton I hope you will know our Seasearch Guide to Anemones and Corals of Britain and Ireland. We have more or less run out of stock and are working on a second edition. I am trying to sort out the changes in taxonomy but we also want to include new images as digital photography has moved on so far since the first edition. There are a number of species which there seem to be few, if any records of, and a number of them are shallow water species. It occurred to me that you or members of the BMLSS might be in a position to help with images or at least tell me where they can be found and I wondered if you can help by publicising this request. The species we are particularly interested in are: Epizoanthus incrustans (sand/gravel habitat) Stomphia coccinea Anthopleura thallia (rock pools/SW) Aiptaisiogeton pellucidus (tiny, shallow, SW) Haliplanella lineata (harbours, rock pools) other name Diadumene luciae Anemonactis mazeli (deep water) Hacampoides elongatus/abyssorum Cataphellia brodricii Caryophyllia inornata Sphenotrochus andrewianus (free living coral) Hoplangia durotrix Anybody who supplies images we use will get a free copy of the book and the picture acknowledged of course. I hope you can help and look forward to hearing from you Chris Wood National Seasearch Coordinator

Taxonomy
Animalia (Kingdom)
  Cnidaria (Phylum)
    Anthozoa (Class)
      Hexacorallia (Subclass)
        Actiniaria (Order)
          Nyantheae (Suborder)
            Thenaria (Infraorder)
              Endomyaria (Superfamily)
                Actiniidae (Family)
                  Anthopleura (Genus)
                    Anthopleura thallia (Species)
Associated Species