Purple Octopus - using citizen science to discover marine interactions
This is the entity page showing aggregated messages and images for the named entity.


Sarcodictyon roseum

(Philippi, 1842)


Erling Svensen Sarcodictyon roseum - really a close up with my "microskope" kamera - in situ.

Message posted on NE Atlantic Cnidaria on 04 Oct 2013
Erling Svensen Sarcodictyon roseum from yesterdays dive. When first one has seen them once, you see them "all over".....

Message posted on NE Atlantic Cnidaria on 19 Apr 2013
George Brown Sarcodictyon roseum/catenata. Forming a network of red stolons.

David Kipling I usually think of small Alcyonium as being a little button with a cluster of polyps, and you can usually see that little button. Sarcodictyon can have a more disorganised polyp cluster - not usually in a neat disc, but in a more erratic shape. There's also the habitat; in my case the pics I posted were from a silty site where there weren't adult Alcyonium.

David Kipling This pic shows that sheathing of the stolon around the polyp base quite nicely.

Jim Anderson Thanks David - much clearer to me now.

David Kipling For Peter H van Bragt ...

David Kipling A lovely shot of the stolon for Liz Morris and Paula Lightfoot and Sarah Bowen.

Liz Morris Very nice, thanks :)

Message posted on NE Atlantic Nudibranchs on 18 May 2012
Jeremy Pierce Looking through pictures from Mavis Grind shore dive last September and found these two. In a vertical crevice at about 14m......reminded me of a sea fan but with it's branches stuck to the rock face.....can anyone ID them for me ....please!! Cheers JAP.

David Kipling That looks like a stolon-bearing octocoral.

David Kipling Sarcodictyon roseum?

David Kipling Where/who is Mavis Grind Jeremy?

David Kipling Roseum does have a rose-coloured stolon, hence my "??". Must have a look at this other one!

Jeremy Pierce Shetland. The entry to the North Mainland. This was on the North sea side as across the road you can dip in the North Atlantic. The fisherman and Vikings used to drag their boat across from one to the other.....

David Kipling "Clavularia sp on the next page" = where?

David Kipling It's a very striking picture of the stolon arrangement in particular.

David Kipling Chris Wood is looking for updated pictures to put in the reprinted copy of that book...

Chris Wood I am afraid that the taxonomists have been fiddling with the names. What was Sarcodictyon roseum is now S. catenatum and can have white stolon. What Richard Manuel called Cornularia now seems to be Cervera ?atlantica but is a southerly speciees with the only UK record being from Weymouth. I am not convinced that the Clavularia from St Kilda is anything different to S. cateneum and would stick to that name for this one until somebody does some work on the Birtish species.

Chris Wood However as Dawn Watson says its a great picture of the stolon and whislt I have got better pictures for the second edition of the Anemone guide I would like to includde this one too. Could Jeremy Pierce send me a nice big version of his picture please. To chris@seasearch.org.uk many thanks

Jeremy Pierce Will do Chris Wood I'll do it now.Cheers.

Message posted on Seasearch Identifications on 15 Apr 2013
Chris Wood Images of Anemones and Corals We are revising the Seasearch Guide to Anemones and Corals of Britain and Ireland with a view to publishing a second editiion this spring. If anybody has good images they would like us to have a look at please send them to chris@seasearch.org.uk Pictures need to be in situ, and taken in Britain and Ireland. We are interested particularly in images showing behaviour, predation, reproductive activity and those of the following less common species (no jewel anemones please!) Sarcodictyon roseum/catenatum Epizoanthus incrustans (sand/gravel habitat) Stomphia coccinea Anthopleura thallia (rock pools/SW) Aiptaisiogeton pellucidus (tiny, shallow, SW) Haliplanella lineata (harbours, rock pools) Anemonactis mazeli (deep water) Hacampoides elongatus/abyssorum Cataphellia brodricii Caryophyllia inornata Sphenotrochus andrewianus Hoplangia durotrix There is a free copy of the guide for anybody whose pictures we use of course.

Wendy Northway I'll go through my hubby's photos to see if he has anything of interest Chris.

Darryl Mayer I have some of Stomphia coccinea, Mycale lingua (L Sunart, 40m), Imperial Anemone (various colours). Kirsty Jeffery has Dead Men's Fingers "birthing", I've let them know about your call.

Tony Gilbert Chris, have emailed a selection including Sarcodictyon and Epizoanthus.

Message posted on Seasearch Identifications on 05 Jan 2013
Erling Svensen Could this specie be Sarcodictyon roseum, do you think? The C. cornucopiae have not been seen in Norway yet. How do you see the different? The picture is from 10 meters deep, Egersund harbour, and the animals is aprox. 1,5 cm high.

Bernard Picton Dr. Pablo J. Lopez-Gonzalez from Seville recently contacted me to point out that the names I've been using for these small octocorals are wrong. The correct name for Sarcodictyon roseum from the NE Atlantic is Sarcodictyon catenata and it is uncertain which Mediterranean species is Evagora roseum. I don't know if it is possible to distinguish these stoloniferous octocorals from their polyps alone. Cornularia cornucopiae is a common Mediterranean species, but the one which was found by Richard Manuel in SW England is a species of Cervera, possibly Cervera atlantica. Pablo is looking for specimens for DNA and morphological studies.

Erling Svensen I will post what Torleiv Brattegard in Bergen said about this here as well (did it in the Nudi forum). Hello again I have looked at Worms (www.marinespecies.org) and looked at Stolonifera which now has the status of the order. There are 6 families in Stolonifera totaling 29 families so there is little to take off. I went into the family Sarcodictyon which listed eight species. The information about all species are controlled by a Dutchman - Leen van Ofwegen - a little messy specialist!. It is strange that information about the distribution given only for Sarcodictyon roseum, and it is reported from the eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean. Now S. roseum described from the Mediterranean by the German Rudolph Amandus Philippi (1808-1904) and S. catenate append tar by the Englishman Edward Forbes (1815-1854). Forbes took part in an expedition to the Mediterranean in 1841-42, and his art is described in 1847. So there is a possibility that his art can come from Britain or the Mediterranean Sea. Now I have been looking in the Oscar Carlgren (1865-1954) his book on Koraldyr (in Danish fauna vol 51, 1945), and there are mentioned only Sarcodictyon catenatum Forbes in Scandinavia and spread with the same depth as I mentioned in my previous email. Things indicate that Lopez-Gonzalez and Picton's right, and that Carlgren was a good specialist. I should probably change the information I have on my list!! best Regards Torleiv

Wilfried Bay-Nouailhat To complete the discussion, here are three documents. Herdmann's detailed description of S. catenatum http://www.archive.org/download/proceedingsofroy8roya/proceedingsofroy8roya.pdf an other one http://www.repository.naturalis.nl/document/44307 and finally a comparison between S. catenatum and S. rosea http://www.repository.naturalis.nl/document/149348

Bernard Picton Wilfried, thanks for your help in untangling this! Here is the 1995 paper on Cornularia and Cervera: http://www.repository.naturalis.nl/document/150498 As I read it the Sarcodictyon roseum in the 1992 paper becomes Rolandia coralloides of the 2000 paper.

George Brown I've been calling this Sarcodictyon roseum. http://www.facebook.com/groups/NE.Atlantic.nudibranchs/168495086595113/#!/photo.php?fbid=3388776130893&set=a.3388774370849.144526.1614272106&type=1&theater

Message posted on NE Atlantic Cnidaria on 24 Feb 2012
Chris Wood Images of Anemones and Corals We are revising the Seasearch Guide to Anemones and Corals of Britain and Ireland with a view to publishing a second editiion this spring. If anybody has good images they would like us to have a look at please send them to chris@seasearch.org.uk Pictures need to be in situ, and taken in Britain and Ireland. We are interested particularly in images showing behaviour, predation, reproductive activity and those of the following less common species (no jewel anemones please!) Sarcodictyon roseum/catenatum Epizoanthus incrustans (sand/gravel habitat) Stomphia coccinea Anthopleura thallia (rock pools/SW) Aiptaisiogeton pellucidus (tiny, shallow, SW) Haliplanella lineata (harbours, rock pools) Anemonactis mazeli (deep water) Hacampoides elongatus/abyssorum Cataphellia brodricii Caryophyllia inornata Sphenotrochus andrewianus Hoplangia durotrix There is a free copy of the guide for anybody whose pictures we use of course.

Andy Horton http://www.glaucus.org.uk/S-troglo2.htm

Nathan Jones Has this been completed now or are you still receiving pics?

Chris Wood Yes Nathan. The re-write is almost done but not gone to publishers yet so still time for new pictures, especially if they are of the rarer ones.

Message posted on Seasearch on 05 Jan 2013
Erling Svensen Could this specie be Sarcodictyon roseum, do you think? The C. cornucopiae have not been seen in Norway yet. How do you see the different? The picture is from 10 meters deep, Egersund harbour, and the animals is aprox. 1,5 cm high.

Bernard Picton Dr. Pablo J. Lopez-Gonzalez from Seville recently contacted me to point out that the names I've been using for these small octocorals are wrong. The correct name for Sarcodictyon roseum from the NE Atlantic is Sarcodictyon catenata and it is uncertain which Mediterranean species is Evagora roseum. I don't know if it is possible to distinguish these stoloniferous octocorals from their polyps alone. Cornularia cornucopiae is a common Mediterranean species, but the one which was found by Richard Manuel in SW England is a species of Cervera, possibly Cervera atlantica. Pablo is looking for specimens for DNA and morphological studies.

Erling Svensen I will post what Torleiv Brattegard in Bergen said about this here as well (did it in the Nudi forum). Hello again I have looked at Worms (www.marinespecies.org) and looked at Stolonifera which now has the status of the order. There are 6 families in Stolonifera totaling 29 families so there is little to take off. I went into the family Sarcodictyon which listed eight species. The information about all species are controlled by a Dutchman - Leen van Ofwegen - a little messy specialist!. It is strange that information about the distribution given only for Sarcodictyon roseum, and it is reported from the eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean. Now S. roseum described from the Mediterranean by the German Rudolph Amandus Philippi (1808-1904) and S. catenate append tar by the Englishman Edward Forbes (1815-1854). Forbes took part in an expedition to the Mediterranean in 1841-42, and his art is described in 1847. So there is a possibility that his art can come from Britain or the Mediterranean Sea. Now I have been looking in the Oscar Carlgren (1865-1954) his book on Koraldyr (in Danish fauna vol 51, 1945), and there are mentioned only Sarcodictyon catenatum Forbes in Scandinavia and spread with the same depth as I mentioned in my previous email. Things indicate that Lopez-Gonzalez and Picton's right, and that Carlgren was a good specialist. I should probably change the information I have on my list!! best Regards Torleiv

Wilfried Bay-Nouailhat To complete the discussion, here are three documents. Herdmann's detailed description of S. catenatum http://www.archive.org/download/proceedingsofroy8roya/proceedingsofroy8roya.pdf an other one http://www.repository.naturalis.nl/document/44307 and finally a comparison between S. catenatum and S. rosea http://www.repository.naturalis.nl/document/149348

Bernard Picton Wilfried, thanks for your help in untangling this! Here is the 1995 paper on Cornularia and Cervera: http://www.repository.naturalis.nl/document/150498 As I read it the Sarcodictyon roseum in the 1992 paper becomes Rolandia coralloides of the 2000 paper.

George Brown I've been calling this Sarcodictyon roseum. http://www.facebook.com/groups/NE.Atlantic.nudibranchs/168495086595113/#!/photo.php?fbid=3388776130893&set=a.3388774370849.144526.1614272106&type=1&theater

Message posted on NE Atlantic Cnidaria on 24 Feb 2012
Erling Svensen When diving at the Tritonia lineata, the wall have some species that I never have seen any other place. It looks like some kind of sea anemonies, but the grow in a kind of chain (left on the picture). Almost all the pictures from this location I can see this strange animal. Does anybody know what this specie may be?

Wilfried Bay-Nouailhat I think it's the stolon of Sarcodictyon rosea

Erling Svensen I have asked my good friend in Bergen, Torleiv Brattegard, and he agrees with you, Wilfried. Thanks a lot. So maybe the S. rosea is the food for this tine nudy?

Bernard Picton Well done, Erling, we speculated that Tritonia lineata fed on Sarcodictyon (I think Sarcodictyon catenata and roseum are synonyms) in the nudibranch guide, mostly because it was the most likely candidate as food. This looks like good evidence. I must ask Kate Lock to look closely in Pembrokeshire where T. lineata is common but we couldn't see Sarcodictyon at the same sites.

Erling Svensen Hi again

Erling Svensen I sent your message, Bernard to Torleiv. I sent his answere to Google translater, and he said: Hello again I have looked at Worms (www.marinespecies.org) and looked at Stolonifera which now has the status of the order. There are 6 families in Stolonifera totaling 29 families so there is little to take off. I went into the family Sarcodictyon which listed eight species. The information about all species are controlled by a Dutchman - Leen van Ofwegen - a little messy specialist!. It is strange that information about the distribution given only for Sarcodictyon roseum, and it is reported from the eastern Atlantic and Mediterranean. Now S. roseum described from the Mediterranean by the German Rudolph Amandus Philippi (1808-1904) and S. catenate append tar by the Englishman Edward Forbes (1815-1854). Forbes took part in an expedition to the Mediterranean in 1841-42, and his art is described in 1847. So there is a possibility that his art can come from Britain or the Mediterranean Sea. Now I have been looking in the Oscar Carlgren (1865-1954) his book on Koraldyr (in Danish fauna vol 51, 1945), and there are mentioned only Sarcodictyon catenatum Forbes in Scandinavia and spread with the same depth as I mentioned in my previous email. Things indicate that Lopez-Gonzalez and Picton's right, and that Carlgren was a good specialist. I should probably change the information I have on my list!! best Regards Torleiv Thought this would be of any interest.

Klas Malmberg Aquatilis Very interesting but there must be more things that T. lineata feeds on? Sarcodictyon isnĀ“t very common in Sweden but we find T.lineata on regular basis. Any more suggestions on foodhabits?

Bernard Picton Yes Klas, this is exactly what puzzles me. Tritonias all (say that and someone will think of an exception) seem to eat octocorals, but we don't have many octocoral species in our area that T. lineata could be eating. Normally they seem to be wandering about on silty rocks. I wonder if the Sarcodictyon is there, but under the silt, or beneath stones?

Kate Lock I shall collate a folder of all our T. lineata photos in Pembrokeshire and see if we can get any clues from those.

Bernard Picton OK, Kate, I had a look at my photos and made an album, "Tritonia lineata looking for next meal".

Sarah Bowen I've just added a picture to that one after a quick trawl of our Tritonia pictures from North Pembs. It's amazing what turns up on the pictures when you have a really good look! Yes, there are Sarcodictyon polyps; perhaps not in every picture but certainly recorded from every dive where a T. lineata was recorded.

David Kipling I've just added some more - again, when we see T. lineata we see Sarcodictyon. All we need now is the shot of the nudi actually eating one ...

Message posted on NE Atlantic Nudibranchs on 01 Mar 2012
Taxonomy
Animalia (Kingdom)
  Cnidaria (Phylum)
    Anthozoa (Class)
      Octocorallia (Subclass)
        Alcyonacea (Order)
          Stolonifera (Suborder)
            Clavulariidae (Family)
              Sarcodictyon (Genus)
                Sarcodictyon roseum (Species)
Associated Species