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Corella eumyota

Traustedt, 1882


Bernard Picton Ascidiella scabra on kelp blade, Larne Lough. There seem to be two similar solitary squirts here (possibly a few small Corella eumyota as well).

Erling Svensen Do you have a close up of the Corella eumyota?

Message posted on NE Atlantic Tunicata on 19 Aug 2013
Mickey Luv Tunicates washed up near Falmouth; should not be that difficult to identify but I am having trouble...too large to be Corella eumyota and to smooth to be Ascidiella aspersa....any ideas?

Julia Nunn some of them look like Corella eumyota - it can get quite large

David Kipling A lot are Ciona (eg slightly greenish ones in upper right) but the middle one do look like eumyota, yes. Atrial siphon on side, and slightly recessed like a Wether's original. Can you see the gut at all (tube of sediment inside)?

Mickey Luv Aha, a mix of species, I'll see if there are still some on the beach and have a better look, thanks!

David Kipling Likely to be mix of Ciona, eumyota and A aspersa if it's like any of the chunks of squirt-covered stuff I've seen in south coast marinas. Here's a pic of C eumyota complete with L-shaped gut (runs along side, aspersa has an 'S' in the middle of the body) and spiral poo.

Bernard Picton Ascidiella scabra on kelp blade, Larne Lough. There seem to be two similar solitary squirts here (possibly a few small Corella eumyota as well).

Erling Svensen Do you have a close up of the Corella eumyota?

Message posted on NE Atlantic Tunicata on 19 Aug 2013
Mickey Luv Tunicates washed up near Falmouth; should not be that difficult to identify but I am having trouble...too large to be Corella eumyota and to smooth to be Ascidiella aspersa....any ideas?

Julia Nunn some of them look like Corella eumyota - it can get quite large

David Kipling A lot are Ciona (eg slightly greenish ones in upper right) but the middle one do look like eumyota, yes. Atrial siphon on side, and slightly recessed like a Wether's original. Can you see the gut at all (tube of sediment inside)?

Mickey Luv Aha, a mix of species, I'll see if there are still some on the beach and have a better look, thanks!

David Kipling Likely to be mix of Ciona, eumyota and A aspersa if it's like any of the chunks of squirt-covered stuff I've seen in south coast marinas. Here's a pic of C eumyota complete with L-shaped gut (runs along side, aspersa has an 'S' in the middle of the body) and spiral poo.

Michelle Simpson Me & Spencer Cook are after help with identifying this sea squirt, Paula Lightfoot thinks it might be Dendrodoa grossularia with a bryozoan growing on it, but any ideas (particularly from David Kipling ;) ) would be greatly appreciated!

Nicola Faulks As soon as I saw it I wondered if it was a faded gooseberry sea squirt complete with little compartmentalised friends! Not seen one on a stipe before tho. Is is a current or surge bashed site? :-)

David Kipling The bryozoan looks like Electra pilosa (more circular cells). I wouldn't argue with Dendrodoa, given the homogenous colour. Your other option would be Stolonica socialis but that's more of a teapot as opposed to coffee pot shape (ie taller) and not really the right habitat - whereas Dendrodoa will come happily into the intertidal. How deep was this Michelle?

Michelle Simpson It was approximately 6m depth in a sheltered bay but there would have been current from the tides I assume, but not really surge.

David Kipling I think Paula's right. The one you would usually see on kelp stipes is Distoma variolous, which is a compound squirt with the animals fused together via their basal tests. It sort-of looks like a pomegranate. This isn't that but does show kelp can be fertile ascidian territory provided they can grow fast enough! I think they like to be raised up slightly so they don't choke to death if covered by sediment ... we get a lot of Didemnids wrapped around holdfasts in Pembs for example.

Michelle Simpson Many thanks for your help David, Paula & Nic I'm glad I spotted it :)

David Kipling Dendrodoa factoid: Unusually for a unitary squirt these are brooders ... the eggs get fertilised inside the animal (with sperm from another animal) and a swimming fully-fledged tadpole larva is released. This swims briefly, finds a nice location and settles down. That's why Dendrodoa is often found as dense aggregations (the apple doesn't fall far from the tree). In contrast, unitaries such as Ciona release eggs and sperm into the water column to take pot luck and be fertilised there ... a very different life history when it comes to how much you invest in the egg/larva. Why is this interesting? Because brooding is a common feature of invasive ascidians (eg Corella eumyota) ....

David Kipling I'll shut up now ;)

David Kipling Sorry dear :)

Spencer Cook Well that went a little over my head, but interesting to read.

Michelle Simpson I'm glad you said that hunni, I was thinking the same thing ;)

Message posted on Seasearch North East England on 01 Aug 2013
Mickey Luv

Mickey Luv very common in my local (Falmouth) rock pools recently but I am not sure what species this is... I am sure one of you does though!

Kirstie Harris Are you Mickey Luv after the League of Gentlemen character? :)

Mickey Luv I am afraid so....

Mickey Luv got it! Indeed a tunicate, Aplidium punctum. Tunicates are booming at the moment, both solitary ones and also Botryllus and Botrylloides.

Mickey Luv Probably a Morchellium argus actually, as they grow to about 4 centimeters

Rohan Holt If you look really close at the ends of the individual zooids you can see small red dots... four around each one. Makes this Morchellium :-)

Mickey Luv Thanks Rohan! Tunicates are tricky to identify I find. There are lots of Corella eumyota around as well but they are not featured in my (excellent) Collins guide. I will write a post about them on my blog this week (anbollenessor.wordpress.com)

Mickey Luv http://anbollenessor.wordpress.com/

Paul Semmens Erring towards Jorunna tomentosa for this though would like others' more informed opinions.

David Fenwick Snr Looks like the sea squirt Corella eumyota to me Paul; it appears to have siphons at the top and to the right, half way down.

David Fenwick Snr Jorunna have just started appearing at Chimney Rocks, Penzance in the past couple of weeks so there's every chance of seeing them down there http://www.aphotomarine.com/sea_slug_jorunna_tomentosa.html

Paul Semmens Thanks Dave

David Fenwick Snr Paul my guess is that the brown animal embedded into the squirt is probably the bivalve mollusc Marbled Crenella, Modiolarca subpicta syn. M. tumida. I've removed a few molluscs from sea squirts recently and to check at home, they've all been this species.

João Pedro Silva From yesterday's night dive in Sesimbra, Portugal. Maybe Ascidia mentula?

David Kipling Ascidia mentula (in my mind) has a more gelatinous test, as opposed to leathery. This reminds me more of something like a Polycarpa, although perhaps not with that amount of crud on it. As a left-field suggestion, how about Asterocarpa humilis (the non-native Compass Squirt) based on the stripey siphons....was this dive near a harbour or marina by any chance?

David Kipling Probably not this actually, stripes are a bit wild! http://www.ceab.csic.es/web/wp-content/uploads/2013/01/Asterocarpa-humilis-4.jpg

João Pedro Silva This spot is about 2km away from Sesimbra's harbour and although the budy harbour of Setúbal is over 20km, ships pass relatively near.

David Kipling Hmmm, not exactly prime territory for a non-invasive. They tend to stick around the harbours/marinas (with the exception of Corella eumyota which seems to be very happy about spreading out onto local reefs!).

Message posted on NE Atlantic Tunicata on 11 May 2013
Becky Hitchin After Chris Wood's mention of red siphons, I remembered that I'm still puzzled by this pic from Walpole Bay tidal pool. Bernard Picton, would you know this? I'm sure it's something obvious, but the siphons seem a bit "exaggerated"

Bernard Picton I'd guess Corella eumyota, Becky. It is now very common in Strangford Lough, invasive. http://www.flickr.com/photos/77857683@N06/8044986797/

Becky Hitchin Now I'm confused again about Corella eumyota, Bernard! The eumyota in Kent look like this ... http://www.flickr.com/photos/elegaer/6355752003/ which is very different. But then I remember David Kipling saying that he wasn't certain about eumyota either ...

David Kipling I'm OK with eumyota now I know to look for the C/L-shaped gut running along the edge of the animal, orange dots around siphon, and spiral poo (all thanks to Becky's lesson). Well if we're having Glossy Ball Bagpipe squirt I can have Spiral Poo Squirt :)

Becky Hitchin Absolutely! I call it corrugated poo squirt, but we can agree to differ. I was ok with eumyota until Bernard said that this one was eumyota!

David Kipling The mucus rope is running in a spiral in the gut, I think. Perhaps we need to dissect a eumyota rectum to settle this argument? :)

Becky Hitchin I can't wait :P At least they are actually quite easy to dissect, they don't fall apart at the first touch of a scalpel

David Kipling We need to get out more, Becky ...

Bernard Picton I think your photo is a juvenile, Becky. What time of year did you take that pic? I'm trusting Julia Nunn, I think she told me the red siphons are characteristic according to John Bishop.. We're all trusting each other a bit here!!

Becky Hitchin :D That was last autumn, I think. Some Kent shores are really gettign covered in eumyota - the smallest I've seen being about 6mm (spring), and the biggest being about 2cm and having the "transparent baked bean with spiral poo" look. Never any protruding siphons, very discrete siphons with small orange dots around each.

Julia Nunn umm it doesnt look like eumyota - puzzling

David Kipling Becky and I had this discussion as part of the east coast squirt trek earlier this year, triggered initially by a squirt we had taken (I think from a marina if I recall) which had a similar non-eumyota like appearance and a bright orange siphon and colourless body. We did wonder if it was the same as this mystery squirt of hers. I'll post some sad pictures of it in a dish as an album, let me know what you think Julia.

David Kipling OK new album 'orange tipped squirt' added.

Becky Hitchin There does seem to be some variance in opinion about Corella eumyota from the spiral poo form to this kind of squirt. As David says somewhere, the spiral poo has one siphon on the side, and the siphons never look as if they are going protrude. The orange tipped one has both siphons on the top, and really can extend quite prominently.

Message posted on NE Atlantic Tunicata on 01 Oct 2012
Becky Hitchin Can I just check this before I put it into marine recorder? Is this Ascidiella aspersa (I think Kent must be the only county around that doesn't have tonnes of these to compare with!)

David Kipling Are those two red siphons attached to the translucent blobs beneath?

Becky Hitchin Yes ... I originally thought they were Corella just with long siphons, but they clearly aren't

David Kipling All the A aspersa I've seen underwater have been non-coloured, off-white solitaries with a rough surface that collects silt. At the surface they are a bit like Corella eumyota but with a rougher surface and no prominent siphon sticking out. So while the clear blobs could be A aspersa, something with a prominent red siphon sticking out of it isn't like anything I've see by was of A aspersa.

Becky Hitchin Drat. I was hoping you'd say it obviously was aspersa and that the red siphons weren't a bit odd. Well then!

David Kipling Aspersa don't really have long siphons as such, just a little fluting. When at rest they close up into a knobbly Wether's original.

Becky Hitchin Well how interesting then. Another weird thing from Walpole Bay pool. That pool is a breeding ground for weird and wonderful creatures. Bernard Picton, would you have any words of wisdom on this?

David Kipling Is this one of those pools that is constantly full of water, gets topped-up at HW with over-flow into it, but is otherwise full of water? How deep is it?

Becky Hitchin Yep, and gets emptied twice a year and we go and play in it. It's about 1.5m deep, maybe 2m

David Kipling When's the next emptying? and are you allowed to snorkel it?

Becky Hitchin snorkel or dive, just the vis is usually pretty bad, though some people got a great dive in there the other day. Autumn equinox time will be the next emptying. It's a great place to poke around in.

Message posted on NE Atlantic Tunicata on 08 Jul 2012
Andy Horton ID query received: “Was scrubbing bottom of boat, scraped off huge clusters of what seemed to be egg sacs (numbering in the hundreds), semi translucent, some sort of embryo (orangey colour, shape indistinct) moving gently inside. Each sac approx 7cm long, approx 4cm across, gelatinous and fluid filled. Can't find any photos that resemble what I saw - wondered whether they were jelly fish eggs, or some sort of fish?” Location: Blackwater Estuary, Essex

David Fenwick Snr Sea squirts?

Peter Richardson Squid eggs?

Mickey Luv sounds like sea squirts to me...

Jon Chamberlain Would be interested to see a picture if they have one as this is my neck of the woods (or I'd be happy to go and have a look if they still have them). The size and colour sounds like Styela clava (squirt) as there were plenty there when we surveyed the Blackwater last year. But perhaps before anything else gets a chance to grow on it so it looks more smooth. The twitching embryo sounds most like a gut of a squirt if visible through the mantle. If only David Kipling would hurry up with his ID book...

David Kipling Semi-translucent would rule out Styela clava (it's leathery and opaque), but could be something like Ascidiella aspera or Corella eumyota. Their guts don't really move around inside though, whereas this sounds quite motile. 7cm x 4cm is big for those too. Ciona intestinalis is bigger though and once out of the water would look like eggs after the siphons have closed and certainly biofoul boat hulls.

David Kipling http://www.nhm.ac.uk/nature-online/species-of-the-day/biodiversity/alien-species/corella-eumyota/distribution-ecology/index.html This is a nice pic of a community of foul(ing) squirts out of the water and looking like eggs/

David Kipling And here's what happens when you don't keep your bottom clean and Ciona finds it ... http://www.dfo-mpo.gc.ca/science/coe-cde/soto/img/m11.JPG

David Fenwick Snr I'm getting a boat!

Andy Horton My boat had a copper sheathed hull. No fouling.

Andy Horton cf. Squid eggs are likely to be found at this time of the year washed ashore http://www.glaucus.org.uk/squeggs.htm

David Kipling Squid eggs would fit better with the description of something moving inside (which squirts don't really do). I don't suppose there's any pictures?

Taxonomy
Animalia (Kingdom)
  Chordata (Phylum)
    Tunicata (Subphylum)
      Ascidiacea (Class)
        Phlebobranchia (Order)
          Corellidae (Family)
            Corella (Genus)
              Corella eumyota (Species)
Associated Species