Purple Octopus - using citizen science to discover marine interactions
This is the entity page showing aggregated messages and images for the named entity.


Phoronis australis

Haswell, 1883


Jose Maria Abad Ortega Phoronis australis (5 mms) symbiotic with Cerianthus membranaceus La Herradura 2008 Nikon D200 in Sea Sea Sigma 105 + Nexus lensX2 Inon Z240X2 F32 1/90

Message posted on Scubashooters.net on 14 May 2013
Jose Maria Abad Ortega Phoronis australis (5 mms) symbiotic with Cerianthus membranaceus La Herradura 2008 Nikon D200 in Sea Sea Sigma 105 + Nexus lensX2 Inon Z240X2 F32 1/90

Message posted on UW photo - Fotosub on 14 May 2013
Jose Maria Abad Ortega Phoronis australis (5 mms) symbiotic with Cerianthus membranaceus La Herradura 2008 Nikon D200 in Sea Sea Sigma 105 + Nexus lensX2 Inon Z240X2 F32 1/90

John Paul Connor Wow Superbe

Message posted on UWphotographers on 14 May 2013
Vasco Ferreira Anyone knows this little Polychaeta? It´s very small, notice the Jewel anemone in the lower part of the photo. Thanks.

Vasco Ferreira A Phoronida... Thanks Dawn, i was kinda lost here!

João Pedro Silva These are very common here in Portugal: http://www.flickr.com/photos/49844432@N08/8872398378/

João Pedro Silva But we also have Phoronis australis usually next to Cerianthus membranaceus: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=635444863147974&set=pb.100000473971278.-2207520000.1373314308.&type=3&theater

Vasco Ferreira I must have been distracted João! First time i saw them, here in North Portugal Marine Park (i´m always looking at the fishes tough).

João Pedro Silva When I'm asked how I spot small animals I usually say it's all a matter of "tuning". I'm usually tuned to small stuff so I miss the big stuff :)

Erling Svensen Very comon in the fjords in Norway too.

Message posted on Seasearch Identifications on 08 Jul 2013
David Kipling Lovely little crown of tentacles - is this a hydroid? ~ 10-12m, Pembrokeshire, tideswept reef.

João Pedro Silva Or Entoprocta?

David Kipling How would I tell the difference?

Marco Faasse João Pedro Silva is correct, these are certainly Entprocta. Pedicellina sp.

David Kipling Thanks! I hope Bernard's hydroid course will include "stuff that sort-of looks like a hydroid but isn't" ;)

Marco Faasse The shape of body and tentacle crown is characteristic.

João Pedro Silva At first the crown looked more similar to a bryozoan's but the long stalk hinted to Entoprocta. I know very little about them but the association of Trapania spp. with these animals triggered my attention. http://www.flickr.com/photos/jpsilva1971/7256479120/

Kerry Lewis Oh god, that's a whole new phylum! I'm ignoring this post.

João Pedro Silva There are more phyla which are usually overlooked :) http://www.flickr.com/photos/jpsilva1971/5199223378/

David Kipling Yes, we had some Phoronis hippocrepia yesterday Kerry ;)

João Pedro Silva Phoronis australis is occasionally also found here, usually associated with Cerianthus membranaceus: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=635444863147974&set=a.635444376481356.1073741836.100000473971278&type=3&theater

Liz Morris These are the best Enctoproct photos I've seen... but get them a lot in my petri dish when in the Cleddau. Nice :)

Cynthia D. Trowbridge David Kipling, theoretically you should be able see both the mouth and anus within the crown of tentacles (hence ento-procta); hydroids just have a mouth and no anus; ectoprocts have anus outside circle of tentacles....so it all depends on whether you can find an anus...

Marco Faasse And for the less anus-oriented people: the stalk of entoprocts is regularly bent to the substrate, probably some stimulation will help.

David Kipling So if I get this right: entoprocta (poo inside tentacles), ectoprocta (poo outside tentacles), and hydroids ... er how do they get away with not having an anus, do they have a funny diet or something?

Marco Faasse In Dutch: mondje=kontje (mouth=anus). Not exactly to be jealous of.

David Kipling Entoprocta aka kamptozoa ... "bowing animals" apparently, good way to remember the bent bit Marco! This is why a classical education is (or in my case, would have been ...) useful. http://www.biblestudytools.com/lexicons/greek/nas/kampto.html

Marco Faasse There you go ... I never knew what kamptozoa meant. How a lack of biblical education makes one a handicapped person ...

Message posted on Seasearch Identifications on 20 May 2013
Ron Silver https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10151697945523458&set=gm.570311116368726&type=1&relevant_count=1&ref=nf

Ron Silver Linda, those are actually Southern Horseshoe Worms, Phoronis australis. They usually occur in clusters and extend from the sand around the base of tube-dwelling anemones.

Message posted on The Global Diving Community on 07 Oct 2013
Taxonomy
Animalia (Kingdom)
  Phoronida (Phylum)
    Phoronis (Genus)
      Phoronis australis (Species)
Associated Species