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Lacuna vincta

(Montagu, 1803)


George Brown Just to add to Cat Wilding's post and Ian Smith's interesting summary. Lacuna vincta is quite common in the north, especially at this time of year. Loch Carron, depth 5.0m.

Message posted on Seasearch Identifications on 04 Mar 2013
Nicola Faulks Can you name all the St Abbs Nudibranchs?

Ann Bailey no, I can get 5, possibly 6

Tom Clarke Thats George in the upper left corner, Fred, Suzy, then Alice, I think the one in the middle is named Theodore...

Nicola Faulks I knew there'd be one.... Tom! :-)

Simon Smith Beat me to it!

Kieron Young thanks tom, you beat me too it :)

Gordon Lambert Looking closer id say the one in the upper left corner is George & Mildred. But that why I need an observer course. Nic when's the next one ?

Bernard Picton Nice Rostanga....

Paula Lightfoot Nice Lacuna vincta (banded chink shell) lurking in the middle photo too! Gordon, Nic and I are just sorting dates for Obs courses at the moment. Thinking of one in Yorkshire in February and one in Darlington/Durham in March, hopefully with Farnes diving the next day if the weather lets us. More info to follow...

Marba Diving defiinatly interested in obs in Yorkshire if im available :)

Gordon Lambert Thanks Paula looking forward to it.

Message posted on Seasearch North East England on 10 Oct 2013
Ian Smith I have added an account of Lacuna vincta at http://www.flickr.com/photos/56388191@N08/collections/ Click links in “Similar Species” section to see those spp. as they are not in the set. I was surprised at the vivid colours of the soft parts. I think this may be due to elements in the foodplants Phycodrys rubens and/or Cryptopleura ramosa on which the summer juveniles shown were feeding. I can’t detect the bright colours on images by George Brown of more adult specimens feeding on Laminaria. But I didn’t find the bright colours on the other spp. of Lacuna I found on the same plants. The two images below are L. vincta and L. parva

Message posted on Seasearch Identifications on 25 Oct 2013
Ian Smith 14 images and detailed account (under image 1) of Cingula trifasciata uploaded at http://www.flickr.com/photos/56388191@N08/collections/72157633613018744/ Includes comparative images with Lacuna vincta summer and winter as sometimes confused.

Message posted on Seasearch Identifications on 13 Aug 2013
Ian Smith I have added an account of Lacuna vincta at http://www.flickr.com/photos/56388191@N08/collections/ Click links in “Similar Species” section to see those spp. as they are not in the set. I was surprised at the vivid colours of the soft parts. I think this may be due to elements in the foodplants Phycodrys rubens and/or Cryptopleura ramosa on which the summer juveniles shown were feeding. I can’t detect the bright colours on images by George Brown of more adult specimens feeding on Laminaria. But I didn’t find the bright colours on the other spp. of Lacuna I found on the same plants. The images below are Lft to rt) L. pallidula, L. vincta & L. parva.

Message posted on British Marine Mollusca on 25 Oct 2013
Ian Smith 14 images and detailed account (under image 1) of Cingula trifasciata uploaded at http://www.flickr.com/photos/56388191@N08/collections/72157633613018744/ Includes comparative images with Lacuna vincta summer and winter as sometimes confused.

Jan Light Wonderful series of images Ian, especially those showing the two species side by side. Also striations on C. trifasciata are really clear in some images. Worth looking at everyone!

Simon Taylor Brilliant as always Ian. :->

Message posted on British Marine Mollusca on 13 Aug 2013
Cat Wilding These eggs were found on the rocky shore at Polzeath this weekend, does anyone have any idea what might have laid them?

David Kipling Size? And what are they laid on?

Cat Wilding about 3/4mm across, laid on saw wrack. A few nudibranch species found on the day

David Kipling Does look like mollusc eggs - what nudis did you see?

Cat Wilding Sea hare and another, have to check what it was.

Douglas Herdson Are they Flat periwinkle - Littorina obstusata/mariae/littoralis?

Cat Wilding aeolidia papillosa

Douglas Herdson Aeolida are larger pink and wavy.

Cat Wilding they are raised, like tinyturquoise donuts

Paula Lightfoot Lacuna vincta eggs?

Cliff Benson Hi Doug, Hope you are well have you had anything to do with I spot a BBC OU thing seems quite good fun!

Cat Wilding Oooh Paula Lightfoot, nice one, that looks bang on! Interestingly not currently listed by Marlin as having any records from the North Cornish coast... :)

Paula Lightfoot Interesting records then, well done! Did you see the adult snails as well or just eggs? http://www.conchsoc.org/spAccount/lacuna-vincta

Ian Smith My first inclination was, like Paula, to Lacuna vincta, but the colour made me look it up in Fretter & Graham, Brit. Prosobranch molluscs (1962). Firstly, Littorina obtusata/mariae spawn is not doughnut shape; it is kidney shape or circular. The latter shape is sometimes confused with spawn of Lacuna pallidula (inverted watch glass shape). F&G say of Lacuna vincta spawn "It forms the familiar yellow rings which may be found from Jan. to early summer on various weeds; Lebour stated that other egg masses of similar shape which are pink or green almost certainly belong to another species." F&G said that the spawn of other British Lacuna spp. had not been described. Maybe Cat's is one of them. But difficult to rear to find out as they hatch as veliger larvae that live in the plankton. Or Lebour might be mistaken.

Cynthia D. Trowbridge Certainly look like Lacuna to me :-)

Message posted on Seasearch Identifications on 04 Mar 2013
George Brown Lucernaria quadricornis, East Lunna Voe, Shetland. About 70mm diameter. Depth 10m. Seemed able to move about using its foot and tentacled arms.

Joanne Porter George Could you post this into the Orkney and Shetland Seasearch group too, I'm sure there are people in that group that would love to see this :)

Allen Collins Fantastic!

George Brown Hi Joanne, working on that right now. I tried a few days ago but failed due to poor reception. Home now! :o)

Penny Martin that is lovely, I really like stalked jellies ...... we have seen craterolophus convolvulus , lucernariopsis campanulata and Haliclystus auricula here in Orkney

Rebecca Helm Really, you saw it wiggle around, moving its foot? Did it adhere with its tentacles?

Rebecca Helm Lovely picture, btw.

George Brown Rebecca, it didn't wiggle but moved its foot. My other photos show its leg shrinking, becoming corrugated and reattaching itself to the kelp. I've also read it eats Lacuna vincta so it's got to be mobile.

Rebecca Helm WOW! So was it holding on with it's "arms" during this process? That is so cool!

George Brown Exactly! A case for video which I would have done if I wasn't frozen to the core. I tried to (very gently!) lift it towards a better camera position but couldn't prise the arm off the kelp. Too cold so gave up!

Allen Collins Yummm. Littorines for lunch.

George Brown Had to Google that Allen! Think I'll stick with a bacon roll.

Andy Horton http://www.seawater.no/fauna/cnidaria/quadricornis.html

Message posted on NE Atlantic Cnidaria on 14 Mar 2013
Taxonomy
Animalia (Kingdom)
  Mollusca (Phylum)
    Gastropoda (Class)
      Caenogastropoda (Subclass)
        Littorinimorpha (Order)
          Littorinoidea (Superfamily)
            Littorinidae (Family)
              Lacuninae (Subfamily)
                Lacuna (Genus)
                  Lacuna vincta (Species)
Associated Species