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Rostanga rubra

(Risso, 1818)


David Kipling Two specimens of Rostanga rubra for Simon Exley, taken yesterday in Pembrokeshire. The site was covered with orange sponge, 99.9 % of which was sponge and 0.1 % was very well-disguised nudibranch! Looking closely it seems the white is caused by a ring, then line, of crown-shaped tubercles being white. It looks like it is wearing a pair of white sunglasses!

Simon Exley Thanks for those, before the other day I had no idea that they could retract the rhinophores.

David Kipling Oh I see what you mean in your photo! I think a lot of nudis can do that - you probably can't toughen-up rhinophores and gills in the same way you can the mantle, and it'll be a big problem if they get nibbled off by a predator.

João Pedro Silva And the rhinophores do get bitten off sometimes.

David Kipling Ouch!

Simon Exley No, I'm pretty sure I saw them just before I took the picture, hence I was surprised when I came back and looked at the picture!

David Kipling You need to put some camouflage paint on your housing ;)

Message posted on NE Atlantic Nudibranchs on 03 Jun 2013
Godfried van Moorsel At João Pedro Silva: My St Abbs specimen of Rostanga rubra had obliquelly lamellated rhinophores with a proeminent tip, and a ring of small tubercles at their base as well as a pale patch :-)

João Pedro Silva Yours is very canonical. Godfried :)

Message posted on NE Atlantic Nudibranchs on 30 Jul 2012
Shôn Roberts I could do with some help on identifying this one. Rostanga Rubra - is one suggestion. Photo taken near Perch Rock in the Menai Straits - North Wales.

Jim Anderson Rostanga rubra (Risso, 1818)

João Pedro Silva Oh yes, not doubt about it.

David Kipling A couple of specimens of Rostanga rubra from yesterday to continue the conversation with Shôn and Liz. Sorry they were actually taken in North Wales (although Ruth Sharratt was with us, does that count?).

Liz Morris very nice example thanks david :-)

David Kipling These were from Pembrokeshire (despite my garbled English, missing a "not").

Message posted on Seasearch North Wales on 03 Jun 2013
Tom Kerr

Tom Kerr Is this Rostanga rubra as well? Photo taken Arran end of June.

João Pedro Silva The ones I've seen had completelly different rhinophores, obliquelly lamellated with a proeminent tip, and a ring of small tubercles at their base: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jpsilva1971/7551528328/in/photostream/

João Pedro Silva Bernard Picton doesn't indicate the shape and orientation of the rhinophores as a distinctive feature but he reffers the "paler patch between the rhinophores": http://www.habitas.org.uk/marinelife/species.asp?item=W13920 Tom, can you get a detailed crop of the head?

Message posted on NE Atlantic Nudibranchs on 30 Jul 2012
Shôn Roberts I could do with some help on identifying this one. Rostanga Rubra - is one suggestion. Photo taken near Perch Rock in the Menai Straits - North Wales.

Jim Anderson Rostanga rubra (Risso, 1818)

João Pedro Silva Oh yes, not doubt about it.

Simon Parker This one's a little trickier. Same location as the one below. Sadly it's got everything retracted which makes life very hard.

Simon Parker About 2cm.

David Kipling I'd probably agree with Dawn, although it'd be good to see the head end to look for that characteristic white mark between the rhinophores. Did you take any pics from another angle Simon? [I'm assuming that the head is upper right!]

Simon Parker My buddy took this one as my camera had died by then. I'll ask if he has any more pictures.

João Pedro Silva I think it's safe to say it's Rostanga rubra. Besides the "sunglasses" as David Kipling puts it in another post, the lamellae on the rhinophores are very distinctively oblique, have a darker patch a mid length (I think it's visible on the right rhinophore). And there's also the tip "extended" of the rhinophores. http://www.flickr.com/photos/jpsilva1971/7551524366/

Message posted on EPAM Nudibranchs on 11 Jul 2013
Simon Parker This was in about 4m inside a cave near Eyemouth, Scotland. It was close to a Cadlina laevis but I didn't think they came in yellow? Rostanga rubra?

Vinicius Padula Bernard Picton

David Kipling Immediate thought would be an unspotty Archidoris pseudoargus. Rostanga rubra is red with white sunglasses (sorry, marks between the rhinophores), neither of which you've got here.

Simon Parker Archidoris seems logical. I'm not used to seeing them this small. This was about 20 mm long.

David Kipling I guess the big ones have to start somewhere ...

Bernard Picton Yes, I think Archidoris pseudoargus. I've certainly seen plain yellow ones and the tubercles are right for that species.

Gary Cobb Bernard I am pretty sure this Doris pseudoargus. I thought Archidoris was replaced by Doris.

Simon Parker I hate to say it but WoRMS has it as Doris pseudoargus. Is nothing safe from name meddling?

Gary Cobb DNA is upstaging the way we are finding out the true species. These things happen. With time man discovers how, through new developments, to accurately ID an animal.

Gary Cobb It also seems Nudibranch Books out date as soon as they are published!

Message posted on EPAM Nudibranchs on 10 Jul 2013
Geoffrey Van Damme

João Pedro Silva You should put the location in every photo. If I didn't suspect this was taken in the other side of the world (from my perspective) I'd tentatively identify this as Rostanga rubra when this is most probably Rostanga arbutus.

Simon Parker This was in about 4m inside a cave near Eyemouth, Scotland. It was close to a Cadlina laevis but I didn't think they came in yellow? Rostanga rubra?

Vinicius Padula Bernard Picton

David Kipling Immediate thought would be an unspotty Archidoris pseudoargus. Rostanga rubra is red with white sunglasses (sorry, marks between the rhinophores), neither of which you've got here.

Simon Parker Archidoris seems logical. I'm not used to seeing them this small. This was about 20 mm long.

David Kipling I guess the big ones have to start somewhere ...

Bernard Picton Yes, I think Archidoris pseudoargus. I've certainly seen plain yellow ones and the tubercles are right for that species.

Gary Cobb Bernard I am pretty sure this Doris pseudoargus. I thought Archidoris was replaced by Doris.

Simon Parker I hate to say it but WoRMS has it as Doris pseudoargus. Is nothing safe from name meddling?

Gary Cobb DNA is upstaging the way we are finding out the true species. These things happen. With time man discovers how, through new developments, to accurately ID an animal.

Gary Cobb It also seems Nudibranch Books out date as soon as they are published!

Message posted on EPAM Nudibranchs on 10 Jul 2013
Tom Kerr

Tom Kerr Does anyone know the species? Photographed in Lamlash Bay during the Seasearch Arran trip last weekend.

Paula Lightfoot Looks like Rostanga rubra (but that eats sponges so not sure what it would be doing on bryozoany-kelp!). There's a North East Atlantic Nudibranch Facebook group you could also post it for more help.

Tom Kerr Thanks Paula. I was looking through my photos of Nemertesia ramosa taken at Arran and I also have pictures of egg ribbons and small nudibranches probably Doto sp?

Message posted on Seasearch North East England on 03 Jul 2012
Simon Exley Rostanga Rubra I think, taken at St Abbs on Friday.

João Pedro Silva Yes, Rostanga rubra (lower case on the specific epithet).

Simon Exley Thanks

João Pedro Silva You're welcome. It's not and easy find here in Portugal, only found it three times. http://www.flickr.com/photos/49844432@N08/7551541176/

Message posted on NE Atlantic Nudibranchs on 02 Jun 2013
João Pedro Silva Rostanga rubra Local: Sesimbra, Portugal Spot: Ponta da Passagem Profundidade: 12m Data: 11-07-2012

Message posted on Nudibranquios on 04 Sep 2013
Orietta Rivolta Rostanga rubra (Risso,1818) Numana,Italy

Message posted on EPAM Nudibranchs on 19 Jun 2012
Simon Exley Rostanga Rubra I think, taken at St Abbs on Friday.

João Pedro Silva Yes, Rostanga rubra (lower case on the specific epithet).

Simon Exley Thanks

João Pedro Silva You're welcome. It's not and easy find here in Portugal, only found it three times. http://www.flickr.com/photos/49844432@N08/7551541176/

Message posted on NE Atlantic Nudibranchs on 02 Jun 2013
Taxonomy
Animalia (Kingdom)
  Mollusca (Phylum)
    Gastropoda (Class)
      Heterobranchia (Subclass)
        Opisthobranchia (Infraclass)
          Nudibranchia (Order)
            Euctenidiacea (Suborder)
              Doridacea (Infraorder)
                Doridoidea (Superfamily)
                  Discodorididae (Family)
                    Rostanga (Genus)
                      Rostanga rubra (Species)
Associated Species