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Limacia clavigera

(O. F. Müller, 1776)


Ruth Sharratt A couple of nudibranchs photographed on a wall at Maidens Isle in Sound of Mull. Had a great weekend's diving there :) I think they are probably limacia clavigera, but not sure. So just in case they are more unusual, I thought I would post the pics.

João Pedro Silva Yes, it's Limacia clavigera.

Ruth Sharratt Thanks, it was the dark orangy/red line which confused me.

João Pedro Silva The side of the foot is not always visible but it does show a pigmented line (it may lok darker because of the shadow cast by the notum). The variation between different tones of yellow and orange is common. http://www.flickr.com/photos/jpsilva1971/6721859335/

Message posted on Seasearch Identifications on 06 Nov 2013
Shôn Roberts Orange Clubbed Sea Slug - Limacia clavigera Photo taken at The Creek - Amlwch - Isle of Anglesey

Jaime Romero Limacia clavigera Lanzarote-Islas Canarias

Bruce Potter fantastic

Diana Schmitt I want one :)

Brian Sellick Nice

Graham Abbott Now that's a cool one!

Orietta Rivolta Amazing nudibranch!

Helgi Winther Olsen Another Limacia clavigera with parasites (?) from the Faroe Islands. You'll see one just behind the right rhinophore.

Message posted on NE Atlantic Nudibranchs on 31 May 2012
Klas Malmberg Aquatilis Limacia clavigera with copepod.

Message posted on NE Atlantic Nudibranchs on 01 Mar 2012
Manuel Martínez Chacón Limacia clavigera... diminutísima

Message posted on Nudibranquios on 15 Nov 2013
Manuel Martínez Chacón Limacia clavigera, a very small nudibranch from Tarifa, Spain.

Message posted on NUDIBRANCH LOVERS on 15 Nov 2013
Morten Bjørn Larsen Limacia clavigera (Nudibranch) Gulen dive center - Norway Nikon D300 Sea&Sea Housing Twin Sea&Sea YS110 Nikon 105mm & 1,4TC 1/250sec f/29 ISO200

Peter Schou Kaiser Ser sgu godt ud min ven :-) hvad med subsee?

Ken Thongpila Very nice shot Morten :-) love the details and background...

Morten Bjørn Larsen Thanks Ken! I was on assignment for the Norwegian dive magazine Dykking. Doing an article about a nudi-safari up there. They have more than 50 species in Gulen on their house reef alone! You can read about it on Christian Skauges web-site

Ken Thongpila Thanks Morten, I will check it out soon. I love to go Nudi hunts with Christian one day too... looked like all of them I haven't seen them before

Morten Bjørn Larsen Hi Ken I know it's on the other side of the globe. But if you get the chance to participate in the nudi-safari it's worth the travel. There are two nudi scientists fra Trondheim university giving lectures, and Christian is giving a - how to photograph nudies - lecture. And it's still easy to get 3-4 dives in every day.

Ken Thongpila Morten, I will put that to the list too... I love to catch up with different nudis. Also might be chance diving with you and Christian too. Need money and time and drysuit :-)

Christian Skauge Excellent shot, Morten - I'm proud of you for getting that one at the nudisafari! And Ken, they have drysuits for hire at the resort, no need to buy one :-)

Morten Bjørn Larsen Thanks a lot Christian! I'll save the rest until they have been published in Dykking, and then I'll post some more in here!

Christian Skauge :-)

Message posted on Underwater Macro Photographers on 24 Mar 2012
Ruth Sharratt A couple of nudibranchs photographed on a wall at Maidens Isle in Sound of Mull. Had a great weekend's diving there :) I think they are probably limacia clavigera, but not sure. So just in case they are more unusual, I thought I would post the pics.

João Pedro Silva Yes, it's Limacia clavigera.

Ruth Sharratt Thanks, it was the dark orangy/red line which confused me.

João Pedro Silva The side of the foot is not always visible but it does show a pigmented line (it may lok darker because of the shadow cast by the notum). The variation between different tones of yellow and orange is common. http://www.flickr.com/photos/jpsilva1971/6721859335/

Message posted on Seasearch Identifications on 06 Nov 2013
Ronni Bless Bekkemellem From todays dive. found on aprox 20m, here, up north in Norway. Nikon D3200-105mm. Can't seem to remember this, or have seen this before. Only thing i think it might be is the Goniodoris Doridina ? F32, 1/100, iso 200. 2x ds51 on half power.

Anna Nudi Burn what a lovely little nudi <3

Ronni Bless Bekkemellem Preaty big one tho! but yeah, a nice one ;)

Ian Smith I'm unfamiliar with Goniodoris doridina, so pleased to see this if correct (I can't find it on WoRMS or an image on the web). But could it be Limacia clavigera lacking the usual orange pigment? It seems to have opaque white where I'd expect orange on L. clavigera, though the gills look a bit different, possibly because of angle of view, and I've not noticed tubercles on the upper surface of the foot of L clavigera like those in your image.

Ian Smith Ronni where did you get the name Doridina? You wrote "Goniodoris Doridina". Species names should always be written with a capital on the first (genus) name and a small letter on the second name (specific epithet). "Doridina" is the name of a large suborder of sea slugs.

João Pedro Silva Don't think it's Limacia clavigera and the lateral processes in this species have a distinct shape (thinner at the base and the tips have a rought texture). Maybe Colga villosa?

Ian Smith Hi Joao, good suggestion ; northern sp. and has tubercles on upper surface of foot. I'll go with it unless someone comes up with a better fit.http://www.nudipixel.net/photo/00042426/

Jussi Evertsen http://www.vm.ntnu.no/nudibranchia/index.php/2011/11/07/wanted-colga-nord-norges-mest-kjente-ukjente-nakensneglgruppe/

João Pedro Silva Thanks, Jussi! Didn't know C. pacifica was also found in Norway. So perhaps it's safer to just call it Colga sp..

Ronni Bless Bekkemellem Added more pictures to a folder here, including the one on this post. https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=oa.436117406499545&type=1

João Pedro Silva There's already an album with unidentified (or to be identified). https://www.facebook.com/media/set/?set=oa.167103413400947&type=1

Message posted on NE Atlantic Nudibranchs on 14 Sep 2013
Terry Griffiths First Nudibranch of 2013 Happy New year all

Arie Vreugdenhil Nice picture, is this Limacia clavigera? Where did you found this one?

João Pedro Silva It is Limacia clavigera.

Message posted on NE Atlantic Nudibranchs on 01 Jan 2013
Jaime Romero

João Pedro Silva Limacia clavigera

Brian Sellick Hi All, Please help in identifying this critter. Found in a rock pool.

Maria Chapman Looks like either a nudibranch, flatworm, or sap sucking slug. Have you tried any of the Humann DeLoach ID books?

Brian Sellick I don't have any ID books. It's a nudibranch.

Maria Chapman Ah. Sorry, will try later with my books. Try posting on www.nudipixel.net for ID. :)

Brian Sellick No prob. I posted it on nudipixel but no luck here either.

Bernard Picton Can you give us a location for this animal? Looks like a Limacia sp.

João Pedro Silva I remember seeing this picture a while ago and getting to the same conclusion that its some Limacia but not like any I've seen before.

João Pedro Silva Nudipixel had it's last update 6 months ago and the update before that also took 6 months. It's not a reliable place to post ID requests... that is, unless you want to wait 6 months (or more).

Maria Chapman From my books... Looks lke a limacia clavigera. More if I find it and will try to send pics via inboox.

Brian Sellick Ramsgate South Africa.

João Pedro Silva Maria Chapman, not like any Limacia clavigera I've seen, even if south african and european individuals are same species (although Ramsgate is not in the Atlantic...). Eventually Limacia ornata but I think probably an undescribed Limacia sp. Which books made you think this could be L. clavigera?

Gary Cobb I agree with you Joao I have never seen this species before either. Limacia sp.

Brian Sellick I think it has been found once before in South Africa. I have never seen it again and i have searched for it.

João Pedro Silva What has been found before, Brian? Limacia clavigera is reported far more than once for South Africa I think the eastern limit was Cape Town. I think Nudipixel and Medslugs have some sightings.

Brian Sellick My apologies, the one in the photo has been found here before although not identified. It was submitted to " The Seaslug Forum" by Valda Fraser.

João Pedro Silva Unfortunately SSF is in a sort of limbo...

Brian Sellick I saw that, very sad.

Paula Lightfoot Hi does anyone know what might have laid these eggs, there were loads of them on a wall at the Farnes yesterday between 9m-12m. The most common nudibranch there was Limacia clavigera but according to other websites their eggs don't look like this. I wondered about Tritonia homergi?

João Pedro Silva These seem too regular and thin for T. hombergii. Tony Gilbert has a photo of it laying eggs.

David Fenwick Snr Have found similar with Favorinus branchialis

Peter H van Bragt For sure not T. Hombergii or Limacia clavigera. There are a few options... Possibly Flabellina gracilis but other aeolids are also an option. Spawn laid on a flat surface looks very often like this, but when laid in hydroids they are very irrugular shaped.

Jim Anderson This looks like Flabellina browni spawn to me.

Bernard Picton or possibly Facelina bostoniensis...

Message posted on NE Atlantic Nudibranchs on 15 Apr 2013
Steven Melvin Does anyone know what algae species this may be that this Limacia clavigera and the sea mat are on?

João Pedro Silva Not sure which bryozoan it's on but I think it feeds on several species.

David Kipling Usually Electra pilosa (circular cells) but I've also seen it on Membranacea membranipora (rectangular cells) in the UK. No idea as to the weed though!

João Pedro Silva Shot it once feeding on M. membranacea (also lots of P. quadrilineata feeding on the same bryozoan at that time) but most of the times I've found it there was no M. membranacea nearby. http://www.flickr.com/photos/jpsilva1971/8443868129/

João Pedro Silva This one appears to be feeding on another bryozoan (no idea which though): http://www.flickr.com/photos/jpsilva1971/6432585343/

David Kipling They do seem to be quite mobile - I've got a lot of pics of them wandering over things that are clearly not bryozoan (eg naked rock!).

Erling Svensen I think the algae are Desmarestia aculeata. Very common here in Norway.

Steven Melvin Yes I think the bryozoa is either E.pilosa or M. membranupora, I am just uncertain about this particular weed that it's on as its been a popular habitat for L.clavigera. I am currently doing my thesis on limacia clavigera distribution in loch fyne and I've also found them quite abundant on what I believe to be Polysiphonia spp but I've seen no evidence for sea mat growing on that particular algae.

David Kipling Looks like you're going to have to take a sample that is part covered with sea mat and key it out - hard to tell the ID with it smothered ;)

Message posted on NE Atlantic Nudibranchs on 04 Mar 2013
Tine Kinn Kvamme From this afternoon dive in Drøbak, Norway. "The kelp forest´s butterfly". Limacia clavigera. Though this one was found on a tube. Approx 10 mm lenght at 18 meters dept.

Rahul Meh-unpronouncable Very nice!

João Pedro Silva We had a kelp bloom in Portugal this year and this usually means lots of polycerids by late summer. Both Limacia clavigera and Polycera quadrilineata were feasting on the bryozoans which grew on the kelp.

Helgi Winther Olsen Limacia clavigera (Faroe Islands) with hitchikers. I darkened the pictures to enhance the parasite (?) in the skin just in front of the right rhinophore.

Arne Kuilman Ah, these I would notice, but I've only seen 1 of these nudibranchs in the Netherlands… They are still quite rare.

Helgi Winther Olsen The are really really common in the Faroes. Definetely between the most common and seen all year round. Massive amounts in spring and summer. Amongst the ones that I have seen on nearly all dive sites.

Arne Kuilman Doridicola agilis copepod in white? (Usually orange)

Message posted on NE Atlantic Nudibranchs on 31 May 2012
Paula Lightfoot Hi does anyone know what might have laid these eggs, there were loads of them on a wall at the Farnes yesterday between 9m-12m. The most common nudibranch there was Limacia clavigera but according to other websites their eggs don't look like this. I wondered about Tritonia homergi?

João Pedro Silva These seem too regular and thin for T. hombergii. Tony Gilbert has a photo of it laying eggs.

David Fenwick Snr Have found similar with Favorinus branchialis

Peter H van Bragt For sure not T. Hombergii or Limacia clavigera. There are a few options... Possibly Flabellina gracilis but other aeolids are also an option. Spawn laid on a flat surface looks very often like this, but when laid in hydroids they are very irrugular shaped.

Jim Anderson This looks like Flabellina browni spawn to me.

Bernard Picton or possibly Facelina bostoniensis...

Message posted on NE Atlantic Nudibranchs on 15 Apr 2013
Erling Svensen A very tiny Palio dubia from yesterdays dive in the harbour. A lot of nudis now, so I hope that Bernard Picton will have a great time when I pick him up in Bergen this week.

Peter H van Bragt Erling, this is Palio nothus, not P. dubia

Erling Svensen Jippppiiiiiii. A new spieie.......... Thanks alot......

Erling Svensen ..... specie.......

Christian Skauge Congrats! This one is really cool, and quite rare in Norway :-) Looking forward to seeing you very soon, btw!

Gary Cobb Geeez what's the water temp?

João Pedro Silva Gary, let's look at the bright side: it's above freezing and warmer than in January :) We have a lot higher temperatures and right now it's 13-14ºC here in Portugal. An interesting thing I've been noticing is that some species occurring both in Iberia and much further north (for instance, in the UK, The Netherlands, Norway, etc) do seem to grow a lot more in colder waters. Examples of such species include Polycera faeroensis, Polycera quadrilineata and Limacia clavigera. More bryozoans? More dissolved oxygen? Don't know...

Gary Cobb Buurrrr! My dry suit will keep me from the chill thats for sure Joao. Thanks! Yes I am finding here on the Sunshine Coast (water temp 26C) <- weep! Species from the tropics up north and about 10 years ago we were finding temporate species but not now.

João Pedro Silva I'm not sure if here we are witnessing species spreading their distribution range or we are getting more (and better) documents of observations.... I'm more inclined towards the latter. Initiatives such as the Nudibranch Safari have been producing really interesting results. Above 15ºC and in the summer I change to a semi-dry (can't stand the heat at the surface).

Gary Cobb I know what you mean! I choose the later!

Anna Nudi Burn What a gorgeous little fella :)

Message posted on NE Atlantic Nudibranchs on 04 Mar 2013
Steven Melvin Does anyone know what algae species this may be that this Limacia clavigera and the sea mat are on?

João Pedro Silva Not sure which bryozoan it's on but I think it feeds on several species.

David Kipling Usually Electra pilosa (circular cells) but I've also seen it on Membranacea membranipora (rectangular cells) in the UK. No idea as to the weed though!

João Pedro Silva Shot it once feeding on M. membranacea (also lots of P. quadrilineata feeding on the same bryozoan at that time) but most of the times I've found it there was no M. membranacea nearby. http://www.flickr.com/photos/jpsilva1971/8443868129/

João Pedro Silva This one appears to be feeding on another bryozoan (no idea which though): http://www.flickr.com/photos/jpsilva1971/6432585343/

David Kipling They do seem to be quite mobile - I've got a lot of pics of them wandering over things that are clearly not bryozoan (eg naked rock!).

Erling Svensen I think the algae are Desmarestia aculeata. Very common here in Norway.

Steven Melvin Yes I think the bryozoa is either E.pilosa or M. membranupora, I am just uncertain about this particular weed that it's on as its been a popular habitat for L.clavigera. I am currently doing my thesis on limacia clavigera distribution in loch fyne and I've also found them quite abundant on what I believe to be Polysiphonia spp but I've seen no evidence for sea mat growing on that particular algae.

David Kipling Looks like you're going to have to take a sample that is part covered with sea mat and key it out - hard to tell the ID with it smothered ;)

Message posted on NE Atlantic Nudibranchs on 04 Mar 2013
David Fenwick Snr Can anyone explain what's going on here with this sea slug egg. Elysia viridis and Facelina auriculata were on the rock and the egg was similar to others with E. viridis. It's the orange dotted transparent area at the 11 o'clock position that I'm interested in, seems strange for it to have come from an Elysia.

David Fenwick Snr It's almost as if a small Limacia clavigera was caught on the egg as the tide went out but it seems too transparent for that.

David Kipling Semi-transparent blob with yellow dots ... if it's a nudi, how about one of the Polyceras or Ancula gibbosa? Not sure if you get them that shallow.

David Fenwick Snr Yes both recorded shallow here so very possible.

Christian Skauge Colorwise it looks like it could be an Onchidoris luteocincta :-)

David Kipling I see what you mean - there's a little red mark. Is this part of the animal David (as opposed to being underneath or a bit of stray red weed)?

David Fenwick Snr The redness appears to be part of the animal but I cannot be sure; the spotting is on the surface the red below. The surface of the animal appears to be finely granular. Will add another image.

David Kipling Ancula is found close to Bottrylus ascidians according to habitas, so would be right for the sort of things you get under rocks. It also has a circular spawn by the look of it from Bernard's picture. Perhaps those are actually its eggs? http://www.habitas.org.uk/marinelife/photo.asp?item=bep2_3285

David Fenwick Snr There wasn't a lot about on the habitat yesterday, pretty low diversity, the reason I kept an eye open for slugs was that there was quite a bit of Alcyonidium gelatinosum about and I found the Elysia and Facelina soon after discovering it. Just a pity I didn't actually see the small slug on the egg mass to get it in water to photograph. Yes ascidians about but no large masses of them seen. So could we be dealing with a spent slug after it has laid?

Message posted on NE Atlantic Nudibranchs on 12 Feb 2013
Tine Kinn Kvamme From this afternoon dive in Drøbak, Norway. "The kelp forest´s butterfly". Limacia clavigera. Though this one was found on a tube. Approx 10 mm lenght at 18 meters dept.

Rahul Meh-unpronouncable Very nice!

João Pedro Silva We had a kelp bloom in Portugal this year and this usually means lots of polycerids by late summer. Both Limacia clavigera and Polycera quadrilineata were feasting on the bryozoans which grew on the kelp.

Niels Schrieken This picture was taken on the english part of the Doggerbank at the wreck Inger Nielsen. The nudibranch Cuthona is well known from the English waters, but what caught my attention was the foraging behavior. With at least 40 individuals encircled around a metal tube eating Hydractinia echinata from the left side of the tube and leaving eggstrings behind. I find it awesome to see.

Christian Skauge Fantasic shot! Talk about teamwork :-)

David Kipling Good grief, amazing! How deep was this?

Niels Schrieken It's about 20 meters deep.

George Brown Incredible photograph of fascinating behaviour.

Julia Nunn absilutely wonderful picture

Tony Gilbert Amazing shot, I am still looking for C. nana on Hydractinia, so every hermit crab with "fur" that comes along! Think I just missed a Cuthona nana on this hermit specimen, as it seems that its had a reverse-mohican "haircut" down the centr... http://www.flickr.com/photos/tonyjgilbert-images/7501686530/in/set-72157630420768730

Christian Skauge How about a picture like that, with two C. nana's mating on top of the hermit...?

Niels Schrieken Yes Christian that is where I am always looking for when I see hermitcrab. But I have never thought to see a tube with nana eating hydractina like this.

David Kipling Am I right in thinking we should be calling Cuthona now Trinchesia?

Niels Schrieken In the world register of marine species cuthona nana is the correct scientific name: http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=141627

David Kipling There's a thread on one of the other nudi forums about changing all the Cuthonas to Trinchesia. I personally think we should stop doing that, and move to colour and shape-based names, be much easier to identify them! "Mr Yellow Clubby" is far easier to remember than Limacia clavigera, for example ...

Christian Skauge Problem is, there are lots of different "common names" depending on where you are - latin is the only thing keeping the whole thing together... As for Cuthona to Trinchesia - I have no idea whats right.

Niels Schrieken The other way around if I may believe WoRMS. Example Trinchesia anulata -> Cuthona anulata: http://www.marinespecies.org/aphia.php?p=taxdetails&id=534077

David Kipling There's a long thread on the NUDIBRANCH LOVERS group entitled "Trinchesia instead of Cuthona". I think C nana is actually the sole species allowed to still be called Cuthona!

Christian Skauge DNA matching will eventually save the day :)

Jim Anderson The abstract from Michael Miller's paper in the Journal of Natural Histopry Vol 38 Issue 9, 2004 says in closing. "Re-examination of the local Cuthona species led to a re-assessment of several other tergipedid genera based on the arrangement of the digestive ducts. As a result the genus Cuthona Alder and Hancock, 1855 is restricted to one species, C. nana (Alder and Hancock, 1842), and the genus Trinchesia von Ihering, 1879 re-introduced for the rest of the species previously included in Cuthona." Histopry Vol 38 Issue 9, 2004.

João Pedro Silva I'd really love to hear/read Bernard Picton's view on this.

Message posted on NE Atlantic Nudibranchs on 05 Jul 2012
Simon Exley Limacia clavigera I believe, taken in about 6m, very close to the fresh water run off, anyone know how they cope with fresh water?

Message posted on NE Atlantic Nudibranchs on 23 Oct 2013
Bjørnar Nygård Found a nice Limacia clavigera on todays dive in Bergen, Norway

Christian Skauge Always a favourite :-)

Message posted on NE Atlantic Nudibranchs on 13 Aug 2012
René Weterings "Limacia Clavigera" Divesite "De Zeelandbrug" at a depth of only 5m at high tide, a little bit west of the new stairs.

Rob Maller Nice finding at that place Rene!

René Weterings Yes, I was also very surprised!

Message posted on NE Atlantic Nudibranchs on 14 Jun 2012
Arie Vreugdenhil Limacia clavigera, 8 mm large animal, found at 7m depth at Burghsluis Oosterscheld the Netherlands. Note the copepod neat the gils.

Jim Anderson Limacia clavigera Loch Fyne, Scotland

Ashley Missen What an Amazing looking Nudi Jim - Great Shot

Giacomo Cavazzini Fresh water?

Deb Aston Just love it, what lens do you use?

Jim Anderson I have a NEX-5 with 18-55 lens in a Nauticam housing and SubSEE +10 dioptre

Deb Aston thanks Jim

João Pedro Silva Limacia clavigera Local: Sesimbra, Portugal Spot: Paredes do Cabo Profundidade: 13m Data: 31-07-2013

Message posted on Nudibranquios on 08 Sep 2013
Samantha Varns A few of my own pics species clarification would be appreciated xxx

João Pedro Silva This one is definitelly Limacia clavigera: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10152911946985641&set=a.10152911481660641.1073741835.589765640&type=3&theater

João Pedro Silva Not much detail but the arrangement of the cerata makes me think it's probably Flabellina ischitana: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10152911938905641&set=a.10152911481660641.1073741835.589765640&type=3&theater

João Pedro Silva Doto fragilis: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10152911989860641&set=a.10152911481660641.1073741835.589765640&type=3&theater

João Pedro Silva Limacia clavigera: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10152911481875641&set=a.10152911481660641.1073741835.589765640&type=3&theater

João Pedro Silva Flabellina pedata: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10152911490070641&set=a.10152911481660641.1073741835.589765640&type=3&theater

João Pedro Silva Flabellina affinis: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10152911497540641&set=a.10152911481660641.1073741835.589765640&type=3&theater

João Pedro Silva Not really clear but appears to be Calmella cavolini: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10152911499990641&set=a.10152911481660641.1073741835.589765640&type=3&theater

João Pedro Silva Cratena peregrina: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10152911508385641&set=a.10152911481660641.1073741835.589765640&type=3&theater

João Pedro Silva Crimora papillata: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10152911523160641&set=a.10152911481660641.1073741835.589765640&type=3&theater

João Pedro Silva Facelina auriculata: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10152911530580641&set=a.10152911481660641.1073741835.589765640&type=3&theater

João Pedro Silva Facelina annulicornis: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10152911566780641&set=a.10152911481660641.1073741835.589765640&type=3&theater

João Pedro Silva Flabellina affinis: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10152911929510641&set=a.10152911481660641.1073741835.589765640&type=3&theater

João Pedro Silva Cratena peregrina: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10152911931670641&set=a.10152911481660641.1073741835.589765640&type=3&theater

João Pedro Silva Flabellina affinis: https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?fbid=10152911935540641&set=a.10152911481660641.1073741835.589765640&type=3&theater

Ian Smith I hope Joao gets those kisses now for his effort ;-0

João Pedro Silva I decided not to identify those from "Africa" because I don't know if they're from the Mediterranean, the Atlantic or the Indian ocean.

Samantha Varns Xxx kisses an thank you xxx

João Pedro Silva Samantha Varns, next time you could allow comments on the album as it makes it a lot easier :)

Samantha Varns Sorry didn't realised it was blocked

Bernard Picton Could you add countries to the African ones?

Samantha Varns Easy they were all in Kenya diving off from mombassa the beach was Diana beach :-) xxx

Message posted on NE Atlantic Nudibranchs on 14 Jun 2013
João Pedro Silva Has anyone ever did a "heat map" of the number of species observed per time of the year? For instance, here in Portugal in May-June one can see 20+ species in a single dive but barely exceeding 10 species during the winter months.

Brendan Oonk Thanks to "Stichting Anemoon" and their MOO-project we have good data on seasonal occurance of nudibranches in the Netherlands. The molluscs Atlas that will be published next year contains some graphs showing this seasonal shift. It might be posible to combine these graphs with watertemperature data..... Not sure who has the time, and the wish to do this though

João Pedro Silva Looking forward to see the Atlas. My idea for that map was restricted to the NE Atlantic where we have some species occurring more frequently in different periods in different areas, like Limacia clavigera or Polycera quadrilineata. Not sure these yearly variations are temperature related.

Peter H van Bragt Hello Joao, best nudi spotting along the Dutch coast is for sure late spring (May-July). up to 15-18speciesin a weekend by a single diver. Water temp is than approx 14-16 degrees C, I do not have the data with me where I am now. As far as I know the record is 13 species on one single dive out of a total of 57 species ever been recorded in the Netherlands. Winter time water temps drop here to 0-2 degrees C. Few nudis like this, but most species larvae seem to survive OK. Cheers Peter

João Pedro Silva Thanks, Peter! That period coincides with the peak of nudibranch diversity also here in Portugal, only with a few exceptions like Cadlina laevis and Spurilla neapolitana which appear to be more frequent during the winter. Yes, many species can be found at any time, namely most Felimare villafranca, Felimare cantabrica, 'Felimida' purpurea, Flabellina babai and others. Water temperature has been "strange" during the past few years frequently with 18-19ºC during autumn and 13-14ºC in August. But the temperatures here are usually between 13ºC-19ºC, being 15-16ºC the most common values (and these can occur at any time of the year, it's 16ºC right now). I don't know the "national record" but my personal record until last June was something like 18 or 19 species during a single dive... then I had several dives over 20 species until I got to see 26 during a single dive on the 20th of June.

Peter H van Bragt Hello Joao, we also have some typical winter species, e,g. Aeolidia papillosa: juveniles start in september, they develop through winter, spawn and die in early spring. At your place water temps seem to be rather stable, here they differ greatly between summer and winter and this causes big differences in biodiversity. How large is the Portugese nudi fauna list (incl. species that are extreme rare or have not been seen for a while)?

João Pedro Silva We have ~140 nudibranch species. Latest checklist (2004) has 215 opisthobranchs. Mine and Gonçalo Calado's recent field guide has 115 species (95 nudibranchs and 20 other opisthobranchs) including some which were not included for Portugal in the 2004's checklist (yet present in the checklist as it includes the entire Iberian Peninsula plus the archipelagos of Açores, Madeira, Canarias and Baleares).

Message posted on NE Atlantic Nudibranchs on 06 Dec 2012
Christian Skauge Here's a posting from Jussi Evertsen and Torikld Bakkens blog on nudibranchs. They post some of the stuff in english, and I thought it would be a good idea to share is here when that happens :-)

João Pedro Silva These two species are very common here in Portugal although I've never seen P. quadrilineata with a size as described in the text (40mm... I think the largest I've seen would not exceed 20mm). P. faeroensis is a lot more common. They feed on other species of bryozoan, like Bugula sp.. Here's a recent shot of P. quadrilineata feeding: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jpsilva1971/6511919015

Christian Skauge They grow ridiculously big here north sometimes. The P. faeroensis is very rare here. I have actually never seen one so it's very much on my wishlist.

João Pedro Silva The P. faeroensis shot by Nils Aukan is a bit different from the ones we usually find here. Anyway, this is another shot of P. faeroensis feeding here in Portugal: http://www.flickr.com/photos/jpsilva1971/4884976138

João Pedro Silva I think the same happens with Limacia clavigera. They're usually very small here (and something we don't find every day). P. faeroensis can be seen here any time of the year although they're a lot more common during the summer.

Christian Skauge Hmm... must go to Portugal :-)

João Pedro Silva Great weather, nice food, inexpensive... and a few nudibranchs. You should come :)

Erling Svensen I have seen the faeroensis in Egersund two years. The first time was in 2002. There was quite many that year on the location that is very, very exposed. A picture is printed in my book.

Eric van Andel Last year we had an outburst of the quadrilineata in the Netherlands... http://www.eric-van-andel.nl/index.php?supermode=gallery_view&previewm=1&a=September_2011_Zeeland&image=110911023542_ea-2011-09-10-brug_055-harlekijn.jpg&screenres=1680-1050

Message posted on NE Atlantic Nudibranchs on 03 Feb 2012
Jim Anderson Scottish Nudibranchs are updated 10 December 2011 www.nudibranch.org

Jim Anderson Limacia clavigera

Johny Leffelaer Very nice Jim,very close to the polycera's.;-)

Ashley Missen I must get around to adding your nudi's Jim Anderson - Great work - amazing Photot - Cheers Ash

Taxonomy
Animalia (Kingdom)
  Mollusca (Phylum)
    Gastropoda (Class)
      Heterobranchia (Subclass)
        Opisthobranchia (Infraclass)
          Nudibranchia (Order)
            Euctenidiacea (Suborder)
              Doridacea (Infraorder)
                Polyceroidea (Superfamily)
                  Polyceridae (Family)
                    Triophinae (Subfamily)
                      Limacia (Genus)
                        Limacia clavigera (Species)
Associated Species